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Science in China Daily: high-fat diet increases the risk of offspring obesity
2016-04-07 13:57:38
Researchers have foundResearchers have found that the adverse impact of diet on health can not occur in the case of DNA mutations by egg and sperm cells to their offspring. In a recently published - research "Nature Genetics" magazine in mice, compared with organisms acquired traits of non-genetic provides by far the most powerful evidence. Moreover, although previous studies have shown that sperm cells can carry epigenetic factor, but this is the first time such effects were observed in the egg cell.
 
Scientists have long suspected, parents' lifestyle and behavior choices will affect the child's health through epigenetics. While the DNA or chromosome chemically modified protein can affect gene expression, but it does not change the gene sequence. Freezer Therefore, these changes can be inherited remains controversial.
In the latest study, the German Research Center for Environmental Health endocrinologist Peter Huypens and colleagues for 6 weeks to genetically identical mice fed three kinds of food - high fat, low fat or standard laboratory chow - one. Unsurprisingly, eat a high fat diet mice began to gain weight, and damage tolerance to glucose, which is the early symptoms of type Ⅱ diabetes.
 
Subsequently, the team from the three groups of mice were taken out of the egg and sperm cells, in vitro fertilization and embryo transplantation to get healthy "surrogate" mother's body. Their idea is that if one kind of behavior or physical characteristics can be observed in the offspring, then it can only be transmitted through the medical refrigerator egg or sperm cells.
 
As the offspring of mice subsequently when fed a high-fat diet, obesity has parents who seem to be more likely to gain weight, and glucose intolerance occur, especially if the parents are obese, then. Parents are relatively thin offspring weight gain to a minimum.
 
Surprisingly, the authors report the difference between the male and female offspring: If the parents are obese, the daughter seems more likely to gain weight, and the son are often only glucose intolerance. Compared to the father, the mother's diet seems to have a greater impact on the offspring's metabolism. Huypens said that this is very interesting, because a similar pattern in some human epidemiological studies also appeared. that the adverse impact of diet on health can not occur in the case of DNA mutations by egg and sperm cells to their offspring. In a recently published - research "Nature Genetics" magazine in mice, compared with organisms acquired traits of non-genetic provides by far the most powerful evidence. Moreover, although previous studies have shown that sperm cells can carry epigenetic factor, but this is the first time such effects were observed in the egg cell.
 
Scientists have long suspected, parents' lifestyle and behavior choices will affect the child's health through epigenetics. While the DNA or chromosome chemically modified protein can affect gene expression, but it does not change the gene sequence. Therefore, these changes can be inherited remains controversial.
 
In the latest study, the German Research Center for Environmental Health endocrinologist Peter Huypens and colleagues for 6 weeks to genetically identical mice fed three kinds of food - high fat, low fat or standard laboratory chow - one. Unsurprisingly, eat a high fat diet mice began to gain weight, and damage tolerance to glucose, which is the early symptoms of type Ⅱ diabetes.
 
Subsequently, the team from the three groups of mice were taken out of the egg and sperm cells, in vitro fertilization and embryo transplantation to get healthy "surrogate" mother's body. Their idea is that if one kind of behavior or physical characteristics can be observed in the offspring, then it can only be transmitted through the egg or sperm cells.
 
As the offspring of mice subsequently when fed a high-fat diet, obesity has parents who seem to be more likely to gain weight, and glucose intolerance occur, especially if the parents are obese, then. Parents are relatively thin offspring weight gain to a minimum.
 
Surprisingly, the authors report the difference between the male and female offspring: If the parents are obese, the daughter seems more likely to gain weight, and the son are often only glucose intolerance. Compared to the father, the mother's diet seems to have a greater impact on the offspring's metabolism. Huypens said that this is very interesting, because a similar pattern in some human epidemiological studies also appeared.